CAA RAMP INSPECTIONS

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mak
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CAA RAMP INSPECTIONS

Postby mak » Wed Mar 13, 2013 9:12 am

I believe CAA are conducting random RAMP inspections and there are issues regarding the exact documentation and equipment that we need to carry onboard. They have published the following on their web site and I believe it is self explanatory and easy enough to comply with. Look at the second section for a summary of equipment related to our aircraft types.


Ramp inspections – Nothing to fear!

As aviators, we head out in excitement to the airfield so as to jump into the aircraft as quickly as we can, make off on our desired flight and enjoy the limited time we are able to spend in the air.

Often, no thought goes into documentation and other vital equipment that need to be on board our aircraft and that need to accompany us, each time we take to the sky.

The reality is that even though paperwork won’t make us inherently safe aviators, it is essential to carry these items. Failure to comply with legislation provides grounds for insurance companies to not pay out as we had hoped in the unlikely event of something going wrong. So whilst it brings about stress amongst those undergoing a ramp inspection, it is in the very interests of our entire industry that we ensure you comply with legislation, and thereby also bring about peace of mind that should things go wrong, everything within your power has been done right.

Ramp inspections also help to reveal trends, which in turn equips regulators to assist everyone to ensure compliance. So far they have highlighted that there is much confusion as to what needs to be on board an aircraft in order to comply with legislative requirements. Also, matters surrounding fire-extinguishers, first-aid kits and compass cards alike, indicate to us that a completely different understanding exists amongst aviators as to what to carry on board.

Let’s take some time now to ensure that we are all on the same page.

Documentation – what to carry with you

According to Part 91 regulations - those regulations that form the basis for all civilian aircraft that take to the sky - the owner or operator of an aircraft shall ensure that the following documents, or certified true copies thereof, are carried on board the aircraft on each individual flight:

i. the certificate of registration;

ii. the certificate of airworthiness or, for non-type certificated aircraft, an Authority to Fly;

iii. the appropriate licence and medical certificate of each crew member;

iv. the general declaration (if on an international flight);

v. the aircraft radio station licence; or proof of payment to ICASA;

vi. if passengers are carried, the passenger manifest, unless the information is included in the general declaration;

vii. if cargo is carried, a manifest and detailed declaration of the cargo;

viii. the certificate of release to service;

ix. the navigation log when a navigator is carried;

x. the aircraft flight manual, referred to in regulation 91.03.2, or an equivalent document, which document shall include the statements referred to in technical standard 91.07.31 5(5)(a) of Document SA-CATS 91, if flight in reduced vertical separation minima (RVSM) airspace is contemplated; along with a CAA-approved flight manual certificate;

xi. the mass and balance report;

xii. the flight folio;

xiii. the Minimum Equipment List (MEL), if applicable;

xiv. the noise certificate, if such certificate has been issued for the type of aircraft; and

xv. a list of visual signals and procedures for use by intercepting and intercepted aircraft;

xvi. if a flight in RVSM airspace is contemplated –

- a valid RVSM licence endorsement issued by the Director; and

- if applicable, a valid RVSM operational approval for the particular RVSM airspace.

That’s a mouthful! So in summary…

As can be seen from the above, the list of applicable items will depend entirely upon the type of aircraft you are flying. Naturally, a Boeing BBJ being flown under private operation will be assessed against each of the items listed above. However, the situation is completely different if you fly a smaller aircraft such as a Non-Type Certified Aircraft (NTCA); Light Sports Aircraft (LSA); or even a Conventional Controlled Microlight.

As a rule of thumb, no matter what your type; size or certification, the following are essential for any aircraft:

i. the certificate of registration;

ii. the certificate of airworthiness or, for non-type certificated aircraft, an Authority to Fly;

iii. the appropriate licence and medical certificate of each crew member;

iv. the aircraft radio station licence; or proof of payment to ICASA;

v. the certificate of release to service;

vi. the aircraft flight manual, either the Pilot’s Operating Handbook; or the owners aircraft manual accompanied with a CAA approval certificate for that flight manual;

vii. the mass and balance report;

viii. the flight folio; and

ix. a list of visual signals and procedures for use by intercepting and intercepted aircraft.


Safety is your concern

In addition to documentation that is needed on board, a number of crucial safety-related items are also essential for carriage.

a) Hand-held fire extinguishers

The regulation states that no owner or operator of an aircraft shall operate the aircraft unless such aircraft is equipped with the appropriate hand-held fire extinguishers as prescribed in Document SA-CATS 91.04.21, which specifies the exact requirements for the varying type of operations. In summary however, the table herewith shows the number of extinguishers that are required:

Maximum approved passenger
seating configuration Number of extinguishers

7 to 30 1

We are also looking to ensure that the extinguisher is, in fact, serviced regularly and is carried within its expiry period; that the indicator rests well within the green arc; and that the pin is properly in place.

b) First aid kits

No owner or operator of an aircraft used in general aviation operations shall operate the aircraft unless such aircraft is equipped with the first aid kit consisting of the medical supplies as prescribed in Document SA-CATS 91.

The regulation also calls for the owner or operator to carry out periodical inspections of the first aid kit to ensure that, as far as practicable, the contents thereof are in a condition necessary for their intended use. This implies that careful attention must be given to the expiry date of the overall kit and its individual items within. The contents of the first aid kit shall therefore be replenished at regular intervals, in accordance with the instructions contained on their labels, or as circumstances require.

Universal precaution kits specified in Document SA-CATS 91 are only applicable to owners or operators of aircraft used in general aviation operations for which the maximum certificated passenger seating is 20 or more and on which is carried a cabin attendant.

So what must be in the standard first aid kit?

The following medical supplies shall, as a minimum, be included in the current first aid kit for aircraft –

a. bandage (unspecified);

b. burns dressings (unspecified);

c. wound dressings, large and small;

d. adhesive tape, safety pins and scissors;

e. small adhesive dressings;

f. antiseptic wound cleaner;

g. adhesive wound closures;

h. adhesive tape;

i. disposable resuscitation aid;

j. temperature reading device (non-mercury);

k. simple analgesic e.g. paracetamol (see Note);

l. nasal decongestant (see Note);

m. gastrointestinal antacid (see Note);

n. disposable glove;

o. first aid handbook; and

p. a list of contents.

Please note that the owner or operator shall ensure that only Schedule 0 medication is included in the first aid kits. The Department of Health has issued exclusions to previously accepted Schedule 0 medications. Owners or operators must consult a qualified pharmacist if they intend to include Schedule 0 medications in their first aid kit.

Number of passenger seats installed Number of standard first aid kits required

0 to 100 1


c) Ground/air emergency signal strips

These strips are essential, as they should be used to alert attention to airborne emergency rescue teams should you go down in bad terrain or remote areas and it may be difficult to locate you from the air.

d) Compass Deviation Cards

In terms of compasses carried on board aircraft, all compasses fitted to South African registered aircraft must be swung on installation, and at 12-monthly intervals thereafter - provided that where other independent direction indicating systems are in use, the interval may be extended to 24 months.

Whilst under the most favourable conditions an annual check is sufficient, it is

recommended that owners of aircraft carry out a check swing every six months. There are also additional conditions as to when a compass should be swung, for example following a lightning strike, so please consult the relevant regulations in this regard.

To allow us an opportunity to check that the compass has indeed been swung according to requirements, a deviation card must be installed on, or in close proximity to each compass. Of importance is the date when the compass swing was carried out, and not the date when the next swing is required.

So what about the condition of the aircraft?

I’m sure your next question would be to find out if the inspectors only worry about the documentation, or if they also care about the state of your aircraft?

As part of the overall ramp inspection, the inspectorate also spends time taking a brief look at the aircraft – both internally as well as externally. Whilst we are not aiming to do a full airworthiness audit at the time of our inspection, we are looking for obvious problems that may cause you an incident or unfortunate accident – either with your next flight, or in a few flights to come.

For us, a ramp inspection is much like a visit to the GP. We are assessing the overall health of your case, and when we are satisfied that you are good to go, we pass a clean bill of health. Matters that are of a very serious nature will necessitate immediate rectification, as would be the case with your own health.

So next time you see one of the inspectors making his way over to the aircraft, don’t see it as a threat. Use the opportunity to learn, and take an interest in assessing the health of your operation. We encourage you to welcome this “mini-audit”, so that we as industry colleagues are happy that you are safe and will continue to live your dream for many years to come.

Ramps - One of the many initiatives to ensure that you keep returning to the skies, time and time again.


Safe flying!
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Re: CAA RAMP INSPECTIONS

Postby MPL Pilot » Wed Mar 13, 2013 2:29 pm

Thank you Mak

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Re: CAA RAMP INSPECTIONS

Postby Condor » Thu Mar 14, 2013 4:25 pm

This is a very positive point of departure and I need to address the Gyro situation only
(being on Gyrotalk and flying a Gyroplane myself)


First we need to understand which items on this list are exempt as per my earlier understanding as a SAGPA committee member. It would be great to get an official response from CAA on Gyro’s.

Let’s take some time now to ensure that we are all on the same page.

Documentation – what to carry with you

I deliberately exclude the first section as this looks to me applicable to Type Certified flights and lets jump straight to the second section.


As can be seen from the above, the list of applicable items will depend entirely upon the type of aircraft you are flying. Naturally, a Boeing BBJ being flown under private operation will be assessed against each of the items listed above. However, the situation is completely different if you fly a smaller aircraft such as a Non-Type Certified Aircraft (NTCA); Light Sports Aircraft (LSA); or even a Conventional Controlled Microlight.

As a rule of thumb, no matter what your type; size or certification, the following are essential for any aircraft:

i. the certificate of registration; Noted

ii. the certificate of airworthiness or, for non-type certificated aircraft, an Authority to Fly; Noted

iii. the appropriate licence and medical certificate of each crew member; Noted

iv. the aircraft radio station licence; or proof of payment to ICASA; Noted

v. the certificate of release to service; Noted

vi. the aircraft flight manual, either the Pilot’s Operating Handbook; or the owners aircraft manual accompanied with a CAA approval certificate for that flight manual; Noted

vii. the mass and balance report; Noted

viii. the flight folio; and
Does this mean that the flight folio have to accompany the plane on each flight. I was told during training that the logbooks DOES NOT stay in the plane in case of an accident and the plane is destroyed in a fire. A certified copy is also not practical as the data is updated after each flight
ix. a list of visual signals and procedures for use by intercepting and intercepted aircraft.
What does this mean? We do not fly intercepting aircraft and does therefor not have to carry these. Would be difficult to store accessable in open cockpit.


Safety is your concern

In addition to documentation that is needed on board, a number of crucial safety-related items are also essential for carriage.

a) Hand-held fire extinguishers

The regulation states that no owner or operator of an aircraft shall operate the aircraft unless such aircraft is equipped with the appropriate hand-held fire extinguishers as prescribed in Document SA-CATS 91.04.21, which specifies the exact requirements for the varying type of operations. In summary however, the table herewith shows the number of extinguishers that are required:

Maximum approved passenger
seating configuration Number of extinguishers

7 to 30 1
Gyro have a max of two seats and I read thus excluded.

We are also looking to ensure that the extinguisher is, in fact, serviced regularly and is carried within its expiry period; that the indicator rests well within the green arc; and that the pin is properly in place.

b) First aid kits

No owner or operator of an aircraft used in general aviation operations shall operate the aircraft unless such aircraft is equipped with the first aid kit consisting of the medical supplies as prescribed in Document SA-CATS 91.

The regulation also calls for the owner or operator to carry out periodical inspections of the first aid kit to ensure that, as far as practicable, the contents thereof are in a condition necessary for their intended use. This implies that careful attention must be given to the expiry date of the overall kit and its individual items within. The contents of the first aid kit shall therefore be replenished at regular intervals, in accordance with the instructions contained on their labels, or as circumstances require.

Universal precaution kits specified in Document SA-CATS 91 are only applicable to owners or operators of aircraft used in general aviation operations for which the maximum certificated passenger seating is 20 or more and on which is carried a cabin attendant.

Gyros normally does not have a flight attendant, does this mean we are excluded?

So what must be in the standard first aid kit?
Noted, but do we require a First Aid certificate next???

The following medical supplies shall, as a minimum, be included in the current first aid kit for aircraft –

a. bandage (unspecified);

b. burns dressings (unspecified);

c. wound dressings, large and small;

d. adhesive tape, safety pins and scissors;

e. small adhesive dressings;

f. antiseptic wound cleaner;

g. adhesive wound closures;

h. adhesive tape;

i. disposable resuscitation aid;

j. temperature reading device (non-mercury);

k. simple analgesic e.g. paracetamol (see Note);

l. nasal decongestant (see Note);

m. gastrointestinal antacid (see Note);

n. disposable glove;

o. first aid handbook; and

p. a list of contents.

Please note that the owner or operator shall ensure that only Schedule 0 medication is included in the first aid kits. The Department of Health has issued exclusions to previously accepted Schedule 0 medications. Owners or operators must consult a qualified pharmacist if they intend to include Schedule 0 medications in their first aid kit.

Number of passenger seats installed Number of standard first aid kits required

0 to 100 1


c) Ground/air emergency signal strips
Noted


These strips are essential, as they should be used to alert attention to airborne emergency rescue teams should you go down in bad terrain or remote areas and it may be difficult to locate you from the air.

d) Compass Deviation Cards

Is this applicable to gyro’s where compass normally perform very bad and all pilots rely on their GPS for primary navigation. Must say my plane is maintained by approved AP’s and I have never seen a compass swing certificate besides the entry in the airframe book.

In terms of compasses carried on board aircraft, all compasses fitted to South African registered aircraft must be swung on installation, and at 12-monthly intervals thereafter - provided that where other independent direction indicating systems are in use, the interval may be extended to 24 months.

Whilst under the most favourable conditions an annual check is sufficient, it is

recommended that owners of aircraft carry out a check swing every six months. There are also additional conditions as to when a compass should be swung, for example following a lightning strike, so please consult the relevant regulations in this regard.

To allow us an opportunity to check that the compass has indeed been swung according to requirements, a deviation card must be installed on, or in close proximity to each compass. Of importance is the date when the compass swing was carried out, and not the date when the next swing is required.

So what about the condition of the aircraft?
Noted

I’m sure your next question would be to find out if the inspectors only worry about the documentation, or if they also care about the state of your aircraft?

As part of the overall ramp inspection, the inspectorate also spends time taking a brief look at the aircraft – both internally as well as externally. Whilst we are not aiming to do a full airworthiness audit at the time of our inspection, we are looking for obvious problems that may cause you an incident or unfortunate accident – either with your next flight, or in a few flights to come.

For us, a ramp inspection is much like a visit to the GP. We are assessing the overall health of your case, and when we are satisfied that you are good to go, we pass a clean bill of health. Matters that are of a very serious nature will necessitate immediate rectification, as would be the case with your own health.

So next time you see one of the inspectors making his way over to the aircraft, don’t see it as a threat. Use the opportunity to learn, and take an interest in assessing the health of your operation. We encourage you to welcome this “mini-audit”, so that we as industry colleagues are happy that you are safe and will continue to live your dream for many years to come.

Ramps - One of the many initiatives to ensure that you keep returning to the skies, time and time again.


Safe flying!

Can we request CAA to arrange a inspection date and present our aircraft for inspection after which we are issued with a compliance certificate.
This will indicate to another inspector on another day that the aircraft was inspected and complied?

Just a thought

Please comment on all of the above and share your thoughts.
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Re: CAA RAMP INSPECTIONS

Postby mak » Thu Mar 14, 2013 4:33 pm

I personally believe that CAA must make this part of your yearly ATF. Why not let the person that inspect your aircraft for release to service do this and certify it all in order.

Gerrit, I also saw the fire extinguisher only for aircraft above 6 passengers. I don't know what is correct, but I will keep mine in any case.
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Re: CAA RAMP INSPECTIONS

Postby Gyronaut » Thu Mar 14, 2013 7:29 pm

The visual interceptions signal document referred to is in part 96.06.29 of the CAR's and is attached here.
91.06.29 Intercept.pdf
Visual Interception Signals
(166.6 KiB) Downloaded 542 times
As I understand it you need to print this and keep it in your paperwork on board.

I have also attached the Ramp Inspection Checklist that I keep aboard each of my 3 aircraft and it has worked well for me. (Got it from Braam Hechter years ago in fact)
RAMP INSPECTIONS SELF TEST.doc
Ramp Inspection Self Test
(42 KiB) Downloaded 257 times
Hope this helps

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Re: CAA RAMP INSPECTIONS

Postby Condor » Thu Mar 14, 2013 8:19 pm

Hi Mak.

Cannot agree with you more.

A copy of a valid ATF is suppose to prove almost all of the relevant paperwork as these are required to obtain an ATF, and if not make it part of the paper stack.
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Re: CAA RAMP INSPECTIONS

Postby tka » Mon Nov 30, 2015 7:06 am

What was the conclusion as far as LSA/Trikes are concerned particularly for fire extinguishers and first aid kits?

Thanks
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Re: My CAA RAMP INSPECTIONS

Postby Slabfish » Mon Nov 30, 2015 10:26 pm

Without trying to re-invent the wheel,I made up this simple Ramp Inspection List for Myself, Use it or Don`t use it.
It is a Worksheet , so you can add or take thing off as you like ;-)

1.) Aircraft registration certificate.
2.) ATF Authority To Fly--Valid
3.) Pilot license and Medical certificate--Valid
4.) Radio station license--Valid, or receipt .
5.) Certificate of Release--Valid
6.) Flight manual--SACAA Certified
7.) Mass and balance certificate—renew every 5 years--Valid
8.) Flight Folio--Up to date
9.) Visual emergency signs—space blankets x 2
10.) First aid kit---Valid-date
11.) Fire extinguisher--Valid-date
12.) Compass Deviation card—every 2 years if you have a GPS
13.) Stainless steel Identification plate fixed to fire wall
14.) Equipment List
15.) Aviation Chart of area you are flying in

Or download the Work sheet
Attachments
MY RAMP INSPECTIONS SELF TEST.doc
(42 KiB) Downloaded 58 times
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